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Intel launches new Apollo Lake silicon, but new Goldmont CPU architecture may draw signifi

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Intel launches new Apollo Lake silicon, but new Goldmont CPU architecture may draw signifi

 

Earlier this year, Intel announced that its next-generation Atom architecture, Goldmont, would be confined to netbooks and the low-end of the desktop market. Previously, Goldmont was meant to serve as the anchor for a new range of Intel products and offer the first architectural refresh since Bay Trail launched in 2013.

Unlike Kaby Lake, which got the full launch treatment earlier this year, Goldmont has slipped out the door with almost no acknowledgment or briefing from Intel. Intel has added some features, including full hardware decode for VP9 and HEVC (though not HEVC Main10) support for the S0ix sleep state, Gen9 graphics (up from Gen8), and six PCI Express 2.0 lanes, up from four. The number of Execution Units (EUs) attached to the GPU is also up to 18, from a previous max of 16.

As Anandtech details, however, these relatively modest advances come with a significant increase in TDP. Intel’s previous Atom processors had a TDP of 6.5W across the product stack, while all of the Airmont products unveiled today are 10W chips. That’s a significant jump for the new architecture, though it may not translate into higher power consumption at the wall 

Intel has previously positioned Apollo Lake as a cost-saving opportunity for the various OEMs, as the slide below makes clear:

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